Email Marketing: Stand-Alone Emails vs. Newsletters

When considering your company’s email marketing strategy, it’s important to always remember that your customers want organized information that pertains to them. Most companies utilize a newsletter and a stand-alone email for their email marketing strategy. They each bring something different to the table. Many times, it’s difficult to differentiate the two – but we can help clear up the distinction for you.

Newsletter

It’s helpful to consider a newsletter to be much like a traditional newspaper.  Published on a regular, consistent schedule, they include high-value, free content. Typically, this information is highly desired by the customer – they want to read this stuff and they can  benefit from the information. There are little sales promotions in a newsletter. When you flip through a traditional newspaper, you will see a few ads sprinkled throughout. But the ads are not the primary focus of the newspaper. The news is. And that’s quite like newsletters you send out to your subscribers. They want the news, the information.

Using a website like MailChimp.com to establish your company’s branded email newsletter template is a smart move for your newsletter and email marketing. A template easily organizes your content into sections (or however you choose to organize it). It’s professional to keep your template consistent every week. This builds a trusting relationship with your readers because they are seeing the same layout every time. Organizing your content into clear, neat sections also improves the readability and makes the newsletter a quicker, effortless read for your subscribers. Sticking to your editorial schedule also gives you the flexibility to hire a freelance writer to create content. A freelance writer can focus solely on creating content and sending your newsletter out to your customers on time every week.

Promotional Emails

Stand-alone emails should be transactional, meaning they are sent out in hopes of provoking a new sale or client/customer. Usually the content in an email is simply some text and sometimes a simple graphic header near the top.

The promotional email sequence should do a couple things. First, it needs to educate your readers about your company. Inform them about what you do and really emphasize the product or service your company can offer to your reader. Hopefully your content is persuasive and informative enough to hopefully lead this interaction into a new sale.

They Work Hand in Hand

Even though newsletters and email marketing have different features, purposes and goals, your company should be utilizing both strategies simultaneously. Most people would not be able to communicate the difference between an email and a newsletter, but they need to be receiving both from your company. To optimize your campaigns, you must provide high-value content (in your newsletters) and promote your services (with your emails).

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